Baby Talk

Finally back in Korea!  I’ve been traveling for about the past month in Japan, Vietnam, and Thailand, so haven’t had much time for updating this thing.  I do need to put up some posts about my trips, but I’m not ready to delve into the task of looking through the hundreds of photos that I took  just yet.  So for now, I’ll just talk about something fun- my new baby cousin!  My aunt gave birth to him in May, so he’s getting bigger each time I return from a trip.  In Korea, after you give birth and stay in the hospital a couple of nights, a new mom goes to this sort of resort/hospital for two weeks.  Basically nurses take care of you and your baby.  Moms get massages, do crafts, learn how to breastfeed and bathe their baby, and they feed moms a whole bunch of that seaweed soup (it’s supposed to be good for you).  There are less expensive and more expensive types of these post birth spa things, it’s kind of like a very simple hotel though.  The only people allowed to visit during the two weeks there are the husband and grandparents of the baby.

These days apparently the number of young people having babies in Korea is quite low, so the government pays for the delivery (if you get a c-section it’s a little more) among other tax benefits.  Because my aunt is an American citizen, my cousin will soon get dual-citizenship, and then he will have to decide who he wants to pledge his allegiance to when he becomes 18.  South Korea has a mandatory 2 year military service for all able males.  Some choose to go before university, some after.  Recently a famous Korean star, Hyun Bin, just entered the marines so we won’t see him on tv for about two years (except for the commercials he did prior to leaving).  Here he is after getting his haircut and entering the military base.

Back to babies anyway, in Korea they don’t seem as obsessed as they used to be with having sons, although I’m sure some traditional grandparents might secretly favor the boys.  Koreans usually celebrate a 100 day birthday kind of thing (백일- literally means 100 days) which basically takes root from the days way back when the survival rates for babies were sadly low, so if they got to the 100 day mark, they were pretty much in the clear.

There is also the big deal of a baby’s first birthday (돌) where there is a bunch of food around and also the baby is supposed to pick one of several items off of a table to tell his/her future.  The items usually consist of money, pencil, spool of thread, etc.  If the baby picks up the money, then they will be rich.  If they pick up the spool of thread, they will have a long life.  In my case I picked up the pencil which meant I was to be a great scholar- yeah right.  Anyway, it’s a fun tradition as you can see from the random baby photo below.

I wonder what my cousin will choose!  His English name is Peter, Korean name is Joon-Hui (준휘).  Here’s a photo from the day he was born then one a few weeks later at home.